Equality, equality, equality… and sex.

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Yes, that’s right, drunk Josie can’t consent to sex but drunk Jake can.

Let’s raise a glass to King Jake!

I like equality. It’s soooo damn equal. The equilibrium has been equalizing equality so well that inequality doesn’t exist anymore. Josie has a special placard to help her enter the equal-zone!

What a bunch of bullshit!

Together, feminism and masculism are protecting men and women from their amorous opposites who are plotting to get a piece of action-on-the-easy, right.

Masculism?

Oh that’s right! That one doesn’t exist! Males don’t need protection from females. They don’t need to have an opinion on the matter either. It’s assumed they’ll be fine because equality… well, exists only for females.

Fair enough.

Feminism, on the other hand, does stupid things – like posts literature like this to remind men and women with a ridiculous warning that tries to educate but disempowers females and re-empowers males. It dumb-downs the female in its narrative and then puts Jake in the driver’s seat.

Jake is in charge. Josie is nothing.

Unless Jake’s tying her up and forcing alcohol down her throat, one would assume that Josie’s head has a brain. That’s her hand, her glass, her smile, and her decision to drink what’s inside it. Feminism does its best to help but it inadvertently removes some responsibility from the female by posting this crap. Women no know that if they have morning-after guilt, they’ll then have a Union who’ll turn something relatively small into something big – that can ruin a man.

That’s too bad… for the man.

Men deal with life-errors and move on. They don’t have a union to call upon if they feel the choices they made the night before were bad. They live with their decisions like good, responsible, sexually active adults. No union required.

All is equal – only to those who see it.

And then there’s another logical approach:

Alcoholics Anonymous teaches its people about the affects of alcohol. Spouses and children of alcoholics are told through their equivalent sessions that any individual influenced by alcohol is no longer that individual when drunk. It doesn’t become sexist and suggest that women are better drunks than men or vice versa. It calls it how it sees it. Everyone is someone else during an alcoholic episode. That’s what gets spouses and children through the pain of living with an alcoholic family member.

Back to Jake and Josie.

If Josie puts her body in alcohol’s hands, then alcohol is left in charge of it. If Jake has sex with a drunk Josie, then he’s not having sex with Josie at all. He’s banging a margherita… because the margarita says yes. Margaritas can’t claim rape! Margaritas can’t file suits. Women who leave alcohol in charge of their bodies need to review their relationship with it.

What we all need to do is work on reducing morning-after guilt.

Sex isn’t bad. There’s no need for guilt or shame to be applied to it. A guy who pisses off afterwards is a cad, not a rapist. At the time, it was right thing to do and everyone has to live with that fact. That’s what being an adult is all about. You can’t change your mind later if you didn’t like the outcome.

Women tend to have it worse because being a slut implies negative connotations – and that burden needs to be removed by both feminism and masculism. Frankly, any woman who puts a smile on her and her lover’s face should be seen as a hero not a villain.

Men, and especially women, have got to stop slagging off at promiscuous females. How can something so joyful be turned into something evil?!

Selfishness or jealousy can turning anything evil. Now you have to ask the reason why you want it called evil. Is it more about you than the promiscuity of someone else?

Some of us don’t like all the happiness to go elsewhere…

…because it reminds us of our sadness. – Mx

Anne-Marie Slaughter: Why women need a men’s revolution – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Anne-Marie Slaughter, the best-selling author and former White House advisor, says the gender revolution is stuck at a halfway point because society has not been willing to address the roles of men.

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Professor Slaughter, who famously penned an article under the heading “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All”, told Lateline that women have been liberated from their traditional roles but the same has not been done for men.

“You can’t change the roles of women dramatically and say you can now be like your father and do what men traditionally did and not equally change the role of men, because you get stuck,” she said.

Professor Slaughter was the first woman appointed to the role of director of policy planning at the US State Department, a job that meant she lived in Washington during the week and commuted home to Princeton on weekends.

After several years of trying to balance a demanding job and the needs of her family – particularly a rebellious son – Professor Slaughter quit and returned to a role at Princeton University.

When she penned the “Can’t Have It All” article for The Atlantic in 2012, she was criticised by sections of the feminist movement for betraying the cause.

Professor Slaughter, now the president of the New America foundation, spoke to Lateline about what has changed since her original article was published.

We still treat our sons differently to our daughters

“I looked at my sons and I thought, you know if I’d had daughters, I’d be raising them completely differently than my mother was raised. I’d be raising them to have a career but also to invest time in their families. But my sons were still being raised the way my father was raised.

We still tell our sons, your role in life is to have a career and support a family. We women still expect our sons to be breadwinners even as we ourselves understand that we need to do both.

We have to change the way we treat the men in our life.”

Men need their own revolution

“We’ve liberated women essentially to be men, to do the work that men have traditionally done, and in the process we’ve devalued the work that women traditionally did; the work of care, the work of nurturing. You can’t have a halfway revolution.

You can’t change the roles of women dramatically and say you can now be like your father and do what men traditionally did and not equally change the role of men, because you get stuck.

We now have to focus somewhat paradoxically on men and on valuing that work of care, whether women or men do it.”

We need to support ‘strong, confident men’

“We need to be able to look at a man who has a career, who has a set of goals, but who also says my family is going to come first and see him as a strong confident man who’s willing to break gender stereotypes.

Those men are pioneers, just as much as Germaine Greer or Betty Friedan or Gloria Steinem were pioneers.”

Money matters

“In the United States, childcare for two children costs more than rent in all 50 states. This is where you need public policy solutions as well as workplace solutions. I am among a very narrow band of privileged women who buy our way out of these problems.

If we focus on care, what we’re saying is that the government has to provide an infrastructure of care, just like you’d provide bridges or ports or broadband. That allows all couples or all parents to have access to paid leave and a high quality childcare and increasingly, elder care.

She wanted to retitle the “Can’t Have It All” article

I never meant to tell women that [they still can’t have it all]. I would have loved to have retitled the article because what I thought I was saying was why women still can’t have it all, meaning, here are the changes we have to make so that women can have the same options as men.

I now try and get away from the whole not having it all conversation because it’s not useful, it makes women sound selfish, it just isn’t a good way to go, but to say we still have a lot of changes we need to make until we get to full gender equality, I think that is self evident.

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-03-04/anne-marie-slaughter-women-and-men-revolution/7221596